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Videos uploaded by user “In One Lesson”
LCD Technology: How it Works
 
02:44
Liquid Crystal Displays use an amazing array of technologies to display pictures and text. See how they work!
Views: 204206 In One Lesson
See How Computers Add Numbers In One Lesson
 
14:27
Take a look inside your computer to see how transistors work together in a microprocessor to add numbers using logic gates. Get the book CODE that inspired the video http://amzn.to/pR9MwK This is a great book by Charles Petzold that really breaks down a computer conceptually so that non-technical readers can understand how it works. EDIT: At 00:12, the chip that is circled is not actually the CPU on this motherboard. This is an older motherboard where the CPU was first inserted into a small board and that board was then inserted into a slot on the motherboard. The chip that is circled is called the "northbridge" and helps the CPU communicate with memory. The northbridge also uses transistors and logic gates just like the CPU.
Views: 1033244 In One Lesson
How Barcodes Work
 
04:13
Barcodes In One Lesson. Barcodes have revolutionized modern life. Discover what happens every time you hear a beep at the checkout. I was inspired to make this video based upon an explanation of barcodes I found in a great book called Code: The Hidden Language of Computer Hardware and Software http://amzn.to/pR9MwK . I highly recommend it.
Views: 575709 In One Lesson
Learn Braille In One Lesson
 
07:28
Grade 1 Braille (now called Uncontracted Braille). Braille revolutionized life for the vision impaired. Discover how this remarkable system works. This video will teach you the braille alphabet, numbers and punctuation marks which are found in Grade 1 Braille. I was inspired to make this video after reading a great book called Code: The Hidden Language of Computer Hardware and Software http://amzn.to/pR9MwK I highly recommend it.
Views: 490552 In One Lesson
This is What's Inside a CPU
 
03:41
Go inside the Central Processing Unit to see all the amazing components within! See more about the Scott CPU at http://www.ButHowDoItKnow.com
Views: 298345 In One Lesson
How a CPU Works
 
20:42
*New Course from InOneLesson (Coming Soon): http://SeeCodeClearly.com Uncover the inner workings of the CPU. Author's Website: http://www.buthowdoitknow.com/ See the Book: http://amzn.to/1mOYJvA See the 6502 CPU Simulation: http://visual6502.org/JSSim/index.html For anyone annoyed by the breaths between speaking, try this unlisted version with edited audio: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IkdBs21HwF4 Download the PowerPoint file used to make the video: https://docs.google.com/file/d/0BzwHNpicSnW0cGVmX0c3SVZzMFk The CPU design used in the video is copyrighted by John Scott, author of the book But How Do It Know?. There are a few small differences between the CPU in the video and the one used in the book. Those differences are listed below but they should not detract from your understanding of either. CONTROL UNIT - This component is called the Control Section in the book. It is called Control Unit here simply because that is a more common name for it that you might see used elsewhere. LOAD INSTRUCTION - In this video, what's called a LOAD instruction is actually called a DATA instruction in the book. The Scott CPU uses two different instructions to move data from RAM into the CPU. One loads the very next piece of data (called a DATA instruction in the book) and the other uses another register to tell it which address to pull that data from (called a LOAD instruction in the book). The instruction was renamed in the video for two reasons: 1) It might be confusing to hear that the first type of data we encounter in RAM is itself also called DATA. 2) Since the LOAD instruction from the book is a more complex concept, it was easier to use the DATA instruction in the video to introduce the concept of moving data from RAM to the CPU . IN and OUT INSTRUCTIONS - In the Scott CPU, there is more involved in moving data between the CPU and external devices than just an IN or an OUT instruction. That process was simplified in the video to make the introduction of the concept easier. ACCUMULATOR - The register that holds the output of the ALU is called the Accumulator in the book. That is the name typically used for this register, although it was simply called a register in the video. MEMORY ADDRESS REGISTER - The Memory Address Register is a part of RAM in the book, but it is a part of the CPU in the video. It was placed in the CPU in the video as this is generally where this register resides in real CPUs. JUMP INSTRUCTIONS - In the book there are two types of unconditional JUMP instructions. One jumps to the address stored at the next address in RAM (this is the one used in the video) and the other jumps to an address that has already been stored in a register. These are called JMP and JMPR instructions in the book respectively. MISSING COMPONENT - There is an additional component missing from the CPU in the video that is used to add 1 to the number stored in a register. This component is called "bus 1" in the book and it simply overrides the temporary register and sends the number 1 to the ALU as input B instead. REVERSED COMPONENTS - The Instruction Register and the Instruction Address Register are in opposite positions in the diagrams used in the book. They are reversed in the video because the internal wiring of the control unit will be introduced in a subsequent video and keeping these registers in their original positions made that design process more difficult. OP CODE WIRING - The wires used by the control unit to tell the ALU what type of operation to perform appear near the bottom of the ALU in the video, but near the top of the ALU in the book. They were reversed for a similar reason as the one listed above. The wiring of the ALU will be introduced in a subsequent video and keeping these wires at the top of the ALU made the design process more difficult.
Views: 4024509 In One Lesson
Grade 2 Braille [4/7] - The Words Represented by Braille Letters
 
03:44
Most of the letters of the alphabet in braille, when used by themselves, reprsent words. Learn about these words and how to memorize them in this video. Print a cheat sheet to help you with these words at this link (links to Google docs): http://bit.ly/pdHExu (This video applies to braille used in the United States.)
Views: 14754 In One Lesson
Grade 2 Braille [1/7] - How to Memorize 50 of the 64 Braille Cells
 
11:04
An introduction to Grade 2 Braille, now called Contracted Braille. Print a cheat sheet to help you learn these letters and contractions at this link (links to Google Docs): http://bit.ly/owrmUn (This video applies to braille used in the United States.)
Views: 79036 In One Lesson
Grade 2 Braille [2/7] - Numbers, Capital Letters and Italics
 
07:09
Braille numbers use the same cells as letters A through J, just with a special "numbers" cell before them. Capital letters and italics are similar. Learn about these special characters that are used in both Grade 1 Uncontracted Braille and Grade 2 Contracted Braille. Print a cheat sheet to help you learn these cells at this link (links to Google Docs): http://bit.ly/prztDh (This video applies to braille used in the United States.)
Views: 23350 In One Lesson
Grade 2 Braille [3/7] - Punctuation Marks
 
06:24
We explore the braille cells that represent punctuation marks. Punctuation marks are used in both Grade 1 Uncontracted Braille and Grade 2 Contracted Braille. Print a cheat sheet to help you learn these cells at this link (links to Google Docs): http://bit.ly/oF4OSW (This video applies to braille used in the United States.)
Views: 16555 In One Lesson
Grade 2 Braille [5/7] - Multi-Cell Contractions
 
08:18
Some braille contractions are formed by putting two or more cells together. Learn about these contractions and how to memorize them in this video. Print a cheat sheet to help you with these contractions at this link (links to Google docs): http://bit.ly/rRRecy (This video applies to braille used in the United States.)
Views: 14137 In One Lesson
Grade 2 Braille [6/7] - Rules for Braille Writing & Braille Memory Aides
 
08:48
Learn about the rules for writing braille in this video. Also, you'll see a recap of everything we have learned in the previous braille videos. To print the cheat sheet mentioned in the video, visit this link (links to Google Docs): http://bit.ly/sePOf3 (This video applies to braille used in the United States.)
Views: 11278 In One Lesson
Grade 2 Braille [7/7 - The Final Video With an Example of Braille
 
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We'll use everything we have learned to read a passage in braille. Links mentioned in this video: Online Braille Library: http://s22318.tsbvi.edu/athcgi/athweb.pl?a=st&ci=EF&tm=1248287342&loc=All+Locations&jw= (click the links at the lower right to see lists of the available braille files and then search by name) The Bible in braille: http://www.biblesfortheblind.org/brfdownloads.php Download a Braille Font for your Word Processing Program: http://www.gh-mathspeak.com/downloads.php (I used the "gh SimBraille One font") If you want to type in Braille, you can reference this page which shows you which keys on your keyboard relate to which braille cells: http://louisbrailleschool.org/resources/braille/braille-font/ For a fun quick tool to type things out in Braille, check out this simple web-based program (click on Grade 1 or Grade2 at the top right): http://www.mathsisfun.com/braille-translation.html If you want to become certified as a braille transcriber, check out this web page (we have been working with Literary Braille): https://nfb.org/braille-certification Other Braille Resources: http://www.brl.org/ http://blindreaders.info/brbooks.html http://www.loc.gov/nls/ http://www.brailleauthority.org/ (the agency that decides the rules for braille and publishes the official rulebook: English Braille American Edition which is available online in various places) (This video applies to brailled used in the United States.)
Views: 13164 In One Lesson
(For Kids) Learn to Count to 10 ☺
 
02:14
Watch for numbers!
Views: 35492 In One Lesson